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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
managerial job in the world, president of the united states, leader of the free world. my question was how does he do it? how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not the context of the decisions, that's interesting, too, but what is the leadership style? i looked around for books a serious sustained way. >> host: do you see this as a campaign document coming out very close to the elections? >> guest: they do like to time things when people are paying attention and most americans tune in to politics around election time. >> host: each one of the things the with surprise to readers use it twice in the book those democrats this is a very critical study of the obama leadership all of the sources were democrat. tell us about that decision. >> guest: some of the politics longtime technical people in the defense department or the intelligence services and so on but for the most part these are people that worked alongside the president in one capacity or another in the white house and we need federal agencies in the house of congress to see him up close. what i discover
for president of the united states. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome michele bachmann. [applause] ♪ >> good to see you. thank you so much. god bless you. what a wonderful morning. good morning. thank you for that warm introduction. it is always an honor and a thrill to be back at the values voters summit. i want to say a word about this concept you have heard about because the war on women, the so-called war on women. it has about as much reliability and truthfulness as bill clinton's arithmetic. [applause] this week, as we have seen, there is a real war that is going on across the world. that is what i want to take my few moments that we have to data this morning -- i sit on the intelligence committee. we deal with the nation's classified secrets and this is a real issue. as we survey the political landscape today, it seems like it is deja vu all over again. we are seeing attacks on our embassy in a way we saw in the late 1970's. you would think jimmy carter was back in the white house again, would you? we are desperate for another ronald reagan. this time, i am sorry to say, it is even wo
the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
steer america towards a fiscal cliff. we have voted 65 days this year in the united states senate. there are a number of things. you raise the one about the payroll tax cut, we haven't passed an appropriations bill this year. why is that? harry reid laid it out earlier in "the national journal." forget passing bills, the democrats want to pass the blame game. i see this. we haven't figured out if they are going to pay doctors next year. 30% cut. the president says he has extended the life of medicare, only if he lowers what they pay doctors who take care of doctors 30% and freezes that for the next 10 years. for somebody on medicare, they will have a difficult time finding a doctor to take care of them. host: it appears something fleeds to be done. your payroll tax conferee last year agreed to extend the payroll tax cut holiday for another year. are you in favor of doing so again? guest: i voted against the conference committee report. i don't think it's going to be extended this year. we are looking at tax rates going up. death tax coming back in a much more onerous way. there is
it in the united states, at least, after the protests started. >> but i understand that the government, that the muslim brotherhood government basically knew about this video and it was a big topic of conversation in cairo. >> it certainly was a topic of conversation in the days leading up to the protest there were ultra conservative parties calling for the protests and the united states embassy as well knew the protest was coming and told its staff to go home early that day. >> i think logical thinkers know that this was that this was a call drop of hatred you don't stand by and let this happen. the muslim brotherhood did that but they called for a big big million man march today which they then said don't do it after president obama read morsi the riot act on the telephone. i guess that's what happened, right? >> well, it's fascinating to watch the muslim brotherhood adapt to leadership and adapt to something more than being in opposition party which it was for so long. they are trying to play to their very conservative base here in cairo and egypt while presenting a friendlier face
between the united states and israel. >> reporter: the white house would not say if the two leaders talked about the so-called red line, which of course is a key issue. and no specifics on how they will stop iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. but they did agree to "continue their regular consultations on this issue." wolf. >> dan lothian reporting from the white house. thank you. mitt romney also spoke by phone today with the prime minister. the call came while romney was at the philadelphia airport after making several campaign stops in pennsylvania. that's a state most political experts don't think he'll win. but as cnn's national political correspondent jim acosta's reporting, romney seems to have some other ideas. jim's joining us right now. what's he saying? what's going on in pennsylvania, jim? >> reporter: wolf, you're right. mitt romney did predict he's going to win the state of pennsylvania come november. but even though his campaign has mainly been a focus on fixing the nation's economy, mitt romney in recent days has been stepping up his attacks on the president on the issue
people. because the senate bill was inclusive and every woman member , republican, of the united states senate voted for it. everyone. that was the difference between the two bills. those who were included and a more specific group that are now included, which we think they ought to be, but we also think there aren't people include who had need to be. with all due respect i think my characterization was absolutely accurate. but it's interesting, mr. speaker, that we still haven't eabed the question -- answered the question. we tend to want to talk about other things. 98% of americans should not get a tax increase on january 1 that are making less than $250,000 individually as a family. i think we agree on that. mr. speaker, now i haven't heard that we don't agree on that but we agree on that which means there are 2% on which we do not agree. and that bill has not been brought to the floor that passed the united states senate dealing with that 98%. or 97% of small business. now, mr. speaker, it seems to me if we have agreement on 98% and the president of the united states will sign that
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
of a school. at that point, he was looking at a life that would be his own. fortunately, for the united states, the president called again. in very difficult moments, president obama asked him to come back to national service. being the patriot that he is, he did. he left the school and went back to afghanistan as america's ambassador in a moment when we were beginning yet another transition period this afternoon, we have been very blessed to have him come to carnegie to make this stop but his return from afghanistan. he will speak to us about what the transition in that country holds, what the prospects are at why afghanistan still matters to the united states. ladies and gentlemen, please join me in extending a very warm welcome to the man -- ryan crocker. [applause] >> thank you, ashley. i think. ashley notes that before it went to pakistan in 2004, he very generously spent much of a day with me. to give me some perspectives on part of the world with which i was not very familiar . my career leaned toward the west. pakistan clearly was a different phenomenon. i have always been grateful for
of this violence. watch. >> since our founding the united states has been a nation that respects all faiths. we reject all efforts to denigrate the religious beliefs of others. martha: that is one of the ads that is being played there. we'll have more on that ad, all of that coming up a little bit later in the show. gregg: now to the ongoing investigation into the deadly attack at the u.s. consulate in libya and new reports of serious security lapses and misjudgements that may have made this tragedy a whole lot worse than it neated to be and one of the big questions right now, why u.s. officials ordered extra security in cairo but overlooked a possibility of trouble at other diplomatic posts and allowed the u.s. ambassador in libya to be mostly unprotected? the deputy secretary of state remembering ambassador stevens and other americans killed at a memorial service in libya. >> this is a hard moment, for all of us. it is a moment of shared loss, and it is a moment of shared hope and shared responsibility. we have lost four wonderful colleagues. we have lost a brilliant ambassador, full of coura
'm a forecaster, but we, you know, the united states is in this sort of very different position. you might argue japan, somewhat different circumstances, very high domestic savings rate, managed to sort of face a different set of constraints in that environment, but i ultimately agree with vince that, like, you have to deal with this problem, and you can't get around it. but we're operating under somewhat different constraints. >> john? >> yeah. which is everything's fine until it's not fine. but -- >> i didn't say not -- [laughter] >> the point is this time is different. [laughter] >> anyway, of course -- >> don't want to go there, vince? >> with yeah. >> all this precluding vince and ken's study was music to the ears of the folks at the imf who have had this view for some time that this is how these situations have to be, have to be dealt with. but certainly lew is right, everything doesn't have to get fixed today, but it's got to get fixed, and it's been the key, and the key is that it has to be that people have to have confidence that it will be fixed, and that's the tricky part; namely, how
to the united states, and nobody in this body has worked harder on bringing jobs home to the united states than the presiding officer, the senator from ohio, senator brown. well, the ryan plan would do exactly the opposite. it would tell big corporations that if they move their business operations overseas, they'll never pay taxes on those again. the ryan plan is really a jobs bill for china, for india, for korea. not for america. it's an offshoring rewards act. in addition to those upside down tax changes that harm the middle class and raise their taxes to cut taxes for the highest earners in this country, in addition to its inducements to offshore more jobs instead of bringing them home, the ryan budget would slash $2.9 trillion from our health care programs beginning for workers who retire in 2023, mr. ryan would convert medicare to a voucher system, which according to the nonpartisan congressional budget office would ultimately add an estimated $6,000 in annual out-of-pocket costs that our retirees, our seniors, would have to fork over. it's hard to imagine how future seniors living on a fi
>> there is no the community in the united states of america the votes overwhelmingly 90% for one party. in 1996 i realized we voted republican. we only -- were the only race in the united states of america that is done. it's created a system that decided the republican party where republicans say we've got to win without them. so somebody starts with whether they are racist or not racist, people say stupid things in both parties. i used to get into that debate. i don't anymore. i'm just about trying to build people up, not tear people down. so that was a stupid discussion. do i think that is reflective of the whole party? now i don't. i don't publicly that. my point, i'm not trying to defend him. i don't come to these discussions trying to defend republicans nor do i come trying to defend democrats. i comes and here's what i believe and here's what i support. getting back to the point, if were able to look at some kind of model where we to 20% of the african-american committee and we said okay, you be a democrat, get engaged, go work on the hill, be a big fundraiser, to the polic
the way up to the president of the united states? >> actually, the counterterrorist center of the cia did a spectacular job. and that's what really comes down. in the aftermath, the white house and others said well, they didn't tell us enough. no, they told them everything they needed to know to go on a full alert. and the white house didn't do it. >> senior correspondent john miller, former fbi director joins us now. what do you make of this? >> i think what kirk has stumbled into here is a bit of a well-worn path. we knew some of that. what he has added is the granularity of the actual memos and some of the actual words that were there in front of the white house and the national security team. but, you know, richard clark, who is the national security advisor for terrorism, in his book, he said all the lights were blinking red and we were pushing this in front of condi rice every day and it was hard to get any priority on this. in george tenet's book, he details the briefings that were given. so some of this we knew -- >> but it's something that we didn't know? >> there's some in terms
on poverty in the united states. and when you look at this you can't -- it seems as though as a purchase is a population the country has made some gains of a year's. 22 percent of the population and poverty in 1959 before anti-poverty programs. 15% today. can you add some historical context? >> we are almost back where we were in the 60's when you look at the poverty rate. 15 percent. i'm looking farther back at 59. 22%. >> i see. when you look overall you do see that the rita think the thing to keep in mind of this report to fly here from a lot of people. there's still a lot of people in poverty even though historically gone down from 22 to 15%. 26 million people is still a significant number of people. the other thing is the idea of how we define poverty. this is the official poverty rate for this country. if you're a family of four that's about $23,000 to be considered in poverty. there's a lot of critics out there that say if your family of four and you have $24,000 they're hurting just as much even though you're not counted as being in poverty. especially if you're in a major metrop
the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 19, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i now move to proceed to calendar number 499, s. 3521, which is the tax extenders legislation reported out of the finance committee previously. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 4, s. 3521, a bill amend the internal revenue code of 1986 to extend certain expiring provisions. mr. reid: madam president, following my remarks and those of my distinguishe
the. he served forty-third solicitor general of the united states from june of 2005 until june of 2008. prior to the conversation of solicitor general he served as acting solicitor general for nearly a year, as deputy solicitor general for three years and seven years of service is the longest period of continuous service, in the nineteenth century. he argued 16 cases before the supreme court including the case with which we began this conference today. mr clement received his bachelor's degree from shore -- storage town university service and master's degree in economics from cambridge university. he graduated from harvard law school as supreme court editor of harvard law review. following graduation, and the u.s. court of appeals. and he went on to serve seat chief counsel of the subcommittee on the constitution and property rights is subject today is intriguing lead in title october term 2011, a constitutional moment. please welcome paul clement. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. great to see the cato institute. is an honor to be here at the podium presenting some th
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)